Connect with us

Health

Earbuds can lead to hearing loss, according to scientific study

Published

on

According to research published on Tuesday in the journal BMJ Global Health, it’s common for young people to listen to music, and watch movies and television shows too loudly and for too long.

Researchers conducted a meta-analysis of scholarly studies on risky music listening habits that were published between 2000 and 2021 across three databases.

The unsafe behaviors were monitored based on the usage of earphones as well as places like concerts, bars, and clubs.

According to lead study author, Lauren Dillard, a postdoctoral fellow at the Medical University of South Carolina and consultant to the World Health Organization, “we estimated that 0.67 to 1.35 billion individuals aged 12-34 years worldwide likely engage in unsafe listening practices,” and are thus at risk for hearing loss.

Why earbuds might affect your hearing
Earbuds are frequently preferred over other headphone options because of their less obvious size, they are quite stylish and can aid mobility.

Some earbuds do not have noise cancellation, and this makes people increase the volume when in noisy areas like a crowded bus, but even noise-cancelling earbuds should be avoided because our hearing is seriously endangered and we might not realize how loud the music is.

Any brand of earbuds delivers music directly to your ears because they are placed internally into the ear canal.

However, using earbuds can make your sound 6 to 9 decibels louder, which is more than enough to damage your hearing over time. Some phones, however, let you know when the music is too loud.

The US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention set a safe noise level cap of about 85 decibels (Db).

According to the study, listening for just 212 hours per day is equivalent to 92 decibels. The decibel level of our music can be used to determine whether it is too loud.

According to the study, listeners frequently chose volumes as high as 105 decibels when plugged into a smartphone or listening to loud music in environments where the sound typically range from 104 to 112 dB.

The sound of your earbuds can be as loud as an airplane, airplanes can be as loud as 130 dB and earbuds can reach a maximum volume of 100 dB.

While no one would want to be that close to a jet engine, many of us have been so close to concert speakers or have played our music at volumes that were almost as loud as or even louder than that.

How do you know your music is outrageously loud?
The volume of your music is too loud if you can’t hear someone from an arm’s length away. Another sign that the sound needs to be reduced is if the person you’re speaking to has to shout in reply.

According to scientists, overexposure to loud sounds might wear out the sensory cells and ear structures. Ears may suffer lasting damage if that continues for too long and develop hearing loss, tinnitus, or both.

Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

Health

5 body changes to expect when you stop having regular sex

Published

on

By

There are certain periods when the yearn for sexual intercourse wanes and the body becomes less receptive to sexual arousal.

Almost every sex-having adult can relate to this phase.

For most, it is not a deliberate decision to withdraw from sex, rather it could be as a result of a break-up, death or disagreement, busy schedule, illness amongst other factors.

In the event of a temporary break from sex, here are five things that can happen to the human body.

Lower sex drive

When you’re not having regular sex, there is a possibility that your desire for sex reduces significantly.

Sex is associated with good feelings because the body is flooded with hormones while in the act, so when you stay away, all that energy can be directed to other activities, making sex lose its place.

“Your libido can increase your career drive and manifest more successful ambitions or, if you choose, you may direct your sexual energy into your children versus intercourse,” Fran Walfish, a Beverly Hills family and sex psychotherapist told Medical Daily.

“We can resume the same sexual drive, energy, and appetite we enjoyed before. However, don’t expect a sudden rise in libido if you never had a high sex drive.”

More stress

Sex is known to be a good way to relieve stress, therefore, a lack of regular sex can lead to elevated stress levels.

A 2005 study in Biological Psychology found that penile-vaginal intercourse is associated with better mental and physical performance, and lower stress levels.

People who hadn’t had regular sex showed higher blood pressure spikes in response to stress than those who recently had intercourse.

Less intelligent

A 2013 study discovered sex boosts neurogenesis — the creation of new neurons in the brain — and also improves cognitive function.

Sexual experiences lead to cell growth in the hippocampus, a region of the brain that’s vital to long-term memory. Therefore, sex has the potential to prevent deterioration that leads to memory loss, and dementia.

Weaker immune system

According to a 2004 study, regular sex, in moderation, can boost the immune system and make you less prone to cold.

Researchers measured levels of immunoglobulin A (IgA), an antigen found in saliva and mucosal linings, to evaluate the strength of the immune system of participants.

IgA is the body’s first line of defense against cold and flu, as it binds to bacteria that invade the body, and then activates the immune system to destroy them.

Participants who had frequent sex showed significantly higher levels of IgA than their counterparts.

Erectile dysfunction

A study published in the 2008 American Journal of Medicine discovered that men who had sex less frequently were likely to develop erectile dysfunction two times more than men who had sex frequently.

900 men in their 50s, 60s, and 70s were studied for five years and it was discovered that having sex regularly preserved potency, even at old age.

Continue Reading

Health

Things to know when trying to conceive at 40

Published

on

By

Getting pregnant at the age of 40 is probably more common than you may realise, though it is a fact that the body faces some unique challenges during pregnancy as a woman ages.

However, if you are trying to conceive at an older age, you need to be aware that even though fertility declines naturally as you age, it is possible to get pregnant after the age of 40.

If you are still having your periods, there is a chance you can get pregnant, although you have a much lower chance of conceiving naturally once you celebrate your 40th birthday than earlier in your reproductive years.

There is about five per cent chance during your menstrual cycle that you might get pregnant naturally once you are 40 years old. Compare this to a 25 per cent chance per cycle when you were in your 20s, when your fertility was at its peak.

There are many reasons for the decline in the success rate of pregnancy after 40. The rate of miscarriage is about 40 per cent after the age of 40. This can be due to many reasons, but the biggest reason is that there is a higher chance of genetic abnormality in each egg.

As a woman, your ovarian reserve also decreases over time, meaning you have fewer eggs left by the time you turn 40. The story around eggs is one that has been told several times. When you were born, your ovaries contain all the eggs that you would ever have – about a million in total. This number declines as you age because you typically lose about 30 immature eggs daily. And it’s not just you; this is what every woman of reproductive age experiences.

By the time you reach puberty, your ovaries would contain around 300,000 eggs; and by age 30, you are down to 100,000. At 40, you would have no more than 20,000 eggs left, and these are more than enough for your fertility needs.

Your ovarian reserve can be tested with a blood test called the Anti-Mullerian Hormone test. AMH is a hormone produced by the follicles in your ovaries where egg cells develop. This declines throughout your reproductive lifespan. The lower your AMH number, the fewer eggs remain in your ovarian reserve. But the AMH test result doesn’t tell anything about the quality of the remaining eggs.

The percentage of normal eggs that every woman has decreases as she ages. After age 40, the percentage of genetically abnormal eggs increases. This means that even if those eggs are fertilised, the pregnancy may not end in a live or genetically normal baby.

Clinically, at age 25, a woman has approximately 75 per cent normal eggs. By age 35, that number drops to around 45 per cent, and by 40 years, it’s around 20 to 30 per cent. This is one reason why most physicians recommend genetic testing for abnormal conditions in women pregnant after 40 years.

Besides naturally declining fertility, another challenge you can face as a woman that is over 40 is that you may have been diagnosed with other conditions which can cause pregnancy complications and/or more difficulties getting pregnant. You are at risk if you are obese, hypertensive, diabetic or have thyroid disorders, fibroids and endometriosis.

If you have other medical conditions, you should make sure your physician is aware that you are trying to conceive so that they can optimise your health appropriately to prepare for the pregnancy. A preconception counselling appointment with your regular gynaecologist can help pinpoint areas for improvement and give you personalised recommendations.

Remember that help is available if you haven’t got pregnant. Your fertility specialist can assist with fertility issues, so do not overlook a consultation with a specialist on the options available to you.

Continue Reading

Health

Smoking 3 sticks of cigarette reduces life by 24 hours, says Health expert, Prof Olatunji Aina

Published

on

By

‘Smokers are liable to die young’ – This was Prof. Olatunji Aina’s submission as a keynote speaker at Vanguard’s 2nd Mental Health Summit that held on Thursday in Lagos.

The summit themed: “Mental Health in a Distressed Economy – Drug Abuse: A New Force Driving Mental Health Crises in Nigeria” brought together health experts to speak on the condition that has been referred to as a ‘silent killer’.

Prof Aina who is also a Consultant Psychiatrist identified excessive smoking as one of the conditions that could lead to mental health issues.

He said: “It has been discovered that frequent, persistent smoking can also cause mental health issues and early death.

“According to findings, smoking a stick of cigarette reduces your life by eight hours, so when you smoke three sticks, you know one day of your life is gone. And we know there are those who smoke more than three sticks in a day.

“The damage is does to one’s health cannot be overemphasised, this is why there is always a warning that comes with smoking.”

He further called for more attention to be paid to those battling mental health issues alongside improved advocacy.

Other causes of mental health issues as listed by Prof. Aina are poverty, insomnia and illnesses.

Continue Reading

Most Read...